Obscurities: Adronitis

Obscure 21Have you ever had that feeling that, when you meet someone for the first time, you already know them? Most of us might think of that person as a soulmate – someone we understand and who understands us without using many words or having to explain ourselves.

Well, adronitis might be the antithesis: It means “the frustration with how long it takes to get to know someone”.  There are people I’ve known for years and tried to understand better, who are still a mystery to me. I can’t feel how they are doing or know what they are thinking, even with a lot of words. One might say with such people that they’re “on another wavelength” – and unless that person is a relative, they usually end up falling out of our lives fairly quickly.

May we all meet more people who are soulmates than those who give us adronitis!

 

 

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8 Comments

Filed under Etymology, Obscurities, Writing Prompt

8 responses to “Obscurities: Adronitis

  1. I don’t think it’s a real dictionary word. Yet. And there’s even a marketing company called Adronitis. But a nice word to contemplate.

    • It is a word found in obscure-word dictionaries; words that end up in dictionaries often do so because of popular usage forcing the reluctant hand of guardians of the language; google went from a company name to a verb, and then ended up in dictionaries, as a case in point.
      I’m not really sure why a marketing group would choose that as a name when it means what it means, but maybe they’re betting on ignorance on that point. 😉

  2. Perhaps you (we) should research the etymology of the word adronitis more thoroughly since the “itis” means “inflammation of”. What is an adron?

    • The closest I’ve found is hadron (n.)
      1962, from Greek hadros “thick, bulky” (the primary sense), also “strong, great; large, well-grown, ripe,” from PIE root *sa- “to satisfy.” With elementary particle suffix -on.
      Coined in Russian as adron.
      (etymonline.com)
      So maybe this word derives that sense of heaviness as in hard work to gain an understanding of someone…

    • Then again, it may simply be a “Liff” word applied to a common feeling!

  3. I’ve met a number of people, both face to face and through blogging, who became instant friends. Thankfully, there are many more of those than the other kind.

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