Category Archives: Images

Pareidolia

You’ve probably all heard of the “freeze, flight or fright” instinct (also known as the acute stress response, or hyperarousal) we all react with when facing a danger; it’s what our bodies automatically do to protect us. Pareidolia is related to that; it’s the name for something every human on the planet has probably experienced at some point in their lives: The tendency to interpret a shape or combination of objects as a recognizable entity or face. if we can recognize something as a friend or foe, our bodies can respond appropriately.

If we are walking in a dark forest at night and hear a twig snap, our heart races and adrenaline pumps through our veins; if we then recognize a shadowy silhouette as a bunny rather than a wolf, our body relaxes and we’ll laugh to ourselves for being silly (until we realize that bunnies should be asleep at night, and so this one must either be a were-rabbit or a zombie, but I digress). However, if the shadowy shape turns out to be a wolf, we’ll run. This is an example of the acute stress response; but Pareidolia is when we make wolves out of shoes and trousers hanging over a chair in a dark bedroom. The monsters in the closet that turn out to be a woollen jumper. The house that always seems to be smiling because of the arrangement of windows and doors.

Pareidolia is the rife playground in the imagination of many creative occupations such as cartoonists and CGI designers, and like anything else, if you focus on something, you’ll begin to see it everywhere. Once you’ve seen a smiling face in the headlights and bumper of a particular car model, it’s hard to unsee it.

So, just to put a smile on your face and on the face of an electric plug, here are a few pictures of pareidolia, gathered from Google (if you recognize one as yours, just let me know and I’ll give you the credit due!!). Some are a bit more challenging to see, like the yoda on the pig’s forehead or the downward-looking profile in the elephant’s ear, but once you’ve seen them, you’ll know! If you’ve got any examples of pareidolia, please share them in the comments below! 🙂

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Filed under Articles, Etymology, Images, Musings, Research

Wordless Wednesday #56: Prehistoric

prehistoric googling

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January 16, 2019 · 11:07 AM

Merry Christmas, everyone!

Knocked Down the Xmas Tree

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December 25, 2018 · 11:18 AM

Wordless Wednesday #55: Meanwhile, Somewhere in Alaska…

Children, Dog Teams & Aircraft Use these Roads

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December 5, 2018 · 6:33 AM

Wordless Wednesday #54: Punctuation

Punctuation

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October 31, 2018 · 5:32 PM

Wordless Wednesday #53: Choices, Choices

Drive Slow, Fast

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October 17, 2018 · 11:53 PM

Lost in Translation: Pee Cola

Very popular in Ghana, “pee” means (locally, at any rate) “very good”. I doubt they have many tourists trying the local drink.

LIT - extremely popular soda, which is bottled in Ghana, means -very good Cola

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Filed under Humor, Images, Mistranslations, Obscurities, Translations

Snapshots in History: The Bulletproof Vest

Bulletproof Vests

Talk about trust!

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Filed under History, History Undusted, Images, Military History, Science & Technology, Snapshots in History

The Art of Diatom Microscopy

 

John Quekett.jpg

John Quekett

Recently, I came across an interesting piece of history:  During the Victorian Age, people were fascinated with nature, excursions, and technology.  Microscopes were becoming accessible to the rising middle classes of England, and one man, John Quekett, was fascinated by both microscopes and phytoplankton. He wrote a book called Practical Treastise on the Use of the Microscope, which was a hit among the Victorians, and they began discovering a hidden world of tiny creatures known as plankton and diatoms.

 

Plankton is what makes the ocean waters green, or aqua-blue – the differences are not only the sand or rock colour of a particular region, but also the density of microscopic life in the water. The denser the population, the lower the visibility. A teaspoon of seawater can contain a million living creatures. Regardless of their size, they underpin the marine foodchain, and indeed, all life on earth: Diatoms, which is the most common type of plankton, number in the trillions (there are over 100,000 known species to date), produce more than 20% of all oxygen on earth, and contribute nearly half of the organic life in the oceans. The shells of dead diatoms can cover the ocean bed as deep as half a mile in places, and they fertilize the Amazon basin to a tune of 27 million tons annually.

The Victorians knew very little of all that; they were at the dawn of discovery, and modern sciences owe a lot to those early intrepid explorers – women and men who braved the weather, cliffs and oceans in (heavy skirts and) leather shoes to discover, explore, and appreciate nature.  Not only did they discover it, but they began making beautiful arrangements from the various shapes – they would display their microscopic artwork to friends, much like we might look through someone’s holiday photos today.  These were known as Rosette Slides, and there is still one famous artist keeping this art form alive today: Klaus Kemp, known as the Diatomist. Here are just a few of his masterpieces; to see more, just google his name. The two links in this article will take you to two short videos on the topic.  Enjoy!

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Filed under Articles, History, History Undusted, Images, Research, Science & Technology

One Job…

Two years ago, I ran a series of articles about odd jobs – or what you might also call just downright weird jobs, like worm farmers and paint-drying watchers (yes, they’re actually paying jobs).  I also enjoy coming across photos of simple jobs gone wrong – whether or not they’re messed up out of inattention, ignorance, laziness, or just attempts to get fired or get even. Here are a few such photos, just for fun.  Enjoy!

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Filed under Humor, Images, Signs