Tag Archives: Singing

Now on Spotify!

For those of you who are interested, I just thought I’d make a shameless plug for one of my husband’s albums:  It’s taken us a while to get it up and running due to the complexities of publishing rights and Swiss-pocket-sized publishers, etc., but “Plausch im Räge” is now available on Spotify!  It’s a Swiss German kids’ praise album, under the artist’s name of Stef Hüsler.  Just click on the cover art below!  Even if you don’t understand Swiss German, but are curious to hear the music, or hear my vocals, enjoy – and please pass the word!  In the coming weeks, he’ll be getting the other album spotified, so keep your ears open.

Plausch_im_Raege_Online_Cover - square

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Interconnectivity

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Interconnectivity

This weekend I led a singing workshop; at the time I was focused on the instrument as such, and the amazing, complex expressions the voice can produce.  I covered topics like anatomy, and the psychology of singing, as well as techniques and choices – the “paint palette” a singer can learn and use to produce a desired impact on the listener, painting an image before the mind’s eye through the choice of vocal colour and tone.  For me, the truest sense of interconnectivity in the context of vocals is that they are an expression not only of an individual’s anatomical uniqueness but also the personality, and even the spiritual condition.  I believe that we are created in the image of God – that is, a trinity:  We are body, soul, and spirit; and as such, when one area is facing challenges it will affect the other two areas, as well as the expression of the voice, tone, attitude and even the extent of the performer’s control over their vocals at any given moment.  [I also touch on this topic in my article about layering.]

Afterwards, the writer’s side of my brain kicked in and I began thinking of such things in terms of character development.  As I build a character’s profile, something must challenge that character or they’ll come across as flat and lifeless.  If a character had a traumatic experience with water as a child, they may have to face their fears through swimming across a lake, or getting into a rickety boat; if they’ve been abandoned by a parent, they may need to recognise a paralysing fear that keeps them from committing to relationships, and their arc may have primarily to do with overcoming that fear or not – it may be a side issue, but it will still add depth and humanity to the character.

Whatever weaknesses or challenges I decide on for a given character will guide the story to some extent; they will also influence their attitudes, responses and reactions in connecting with other characters.  These things will in turn influence the way they dress (rebellious, reserved, bold, fearful, quirky to keep people at a distance, etc.), the way they might walk or talk, or certain quirks like mannerisms or ways of speaking.  I might go through a list of a hundred related items (if they’re the main character, especially) to narrow down who the character is, even though most of it might not make it into the final cut.  The more I understand my character, the more consistent their responses, dialogues and actions will be throughout the story.

I just thought I’d share these thought processes with you, in the hopes that they can inspire you in your own characters’ developments.  Give them challenges, and find ways they can overcome (or be temporarily overwhelmed) in the midst of other more pressing issues, and (if you’ve chosen the path of hero-success over hero-failure) still find a way for them to triumph in the end.

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Filed under Articles, Musings, Nuts & Bolts, Plot Thots & Profiles, Writing Exercise

Musings A to Z Challenge: I

Challenge:  Write a short paragraph (100 words or less) daily on a topic beginning with the sequential letter of the alphabet.

Impossibilities

As a singing teacher, I eliminate two words from my students’ vocabularies as soon as possible:  Can’t and impossible.  Anything’s possible, if we only believe in ourselves and our abilities; sometimes it may take someone a bit longer to reach the goal, but if they’re willing to learn and be persistent, they can reach any goal they set.  The only students I’ve ever had who couldn’t reach goals were unteachable ones; those who came to a teacher so they could claim training, but weren’t willing to be challenged. But I’m teachable – I’ve learned not to squander time with such students.

Impossible 2

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Filed under A-Z Writing Challenges, Images, Quotes, Writing Exercise